Tierra del Fuego- The End of the World

Only 620 miles from the Antarctic Peninsula lies the archipelago region of Tierra del Fuego at the southern tip of South America, split between Argentina and Chile. There is little wonder upon arrival why this place is commonly referred to as the End of the World — you are far from everywhere.

Breathtaking views, like this one of Mt. Olivia, are a common sight in Tierra del Fuego.

An abundance of up-close-and-personal wildlife adventures await you in Tierra del Fuego. You can walk with Magellanic penguins on the Beagle Channel or visit a King Penguin colony in Useless Bay. Grab a kayak and paddle among South American sea lions, leopard seals and humpback whales, or canoe alongside blue-eyed cormorants and chimango caracaras. You can even trek high into condor territory. The adventures don’t stop during winter either — snowshoe to a remote cabin in two feet of snow for dinner, navigate alongside an icy river by snowmobile, or practice for next year’s Iditarod behind a close-knit group of racing huskies.

A leopard seal napping in the Magellan Strait. Known as the “Dog of the Sea”, leopard seals are a top predator in the Antarctic region feeding mostly on penguins.
Kayaking close to a South American sea lion colony.
Trip mates warming themselves up near a traditional ‘Asado’ or barbecue.

The area is as rich in culture as it is in wildlife, with deep ties to the indigenous tribes of the Selk’nam and Yamana. The term Tierra del Fuego, which translates to “The Land of Fire”, was given by 16th century Portuguese Explorer, Ferdinand Magellan, to whom the Magellan Strait was named after. Community plays an important role in Tierra del Fuego. Barbeques, or asados as they are called, are an intimate and common practice that encourage conversation amongst friends, family and guests, while overindulging on lamb and wine.

 

 

 

 

The dramatic landscapes of the Andean Mountains are ever-present, with Mt. Olivia and Mt. Cinco Hermanos guarding over Ushuaia, which prides itself as being the Southernmost City in the World. The fjords and glaciers of the Strait of Magellan and its temperamental waters enable you to feel like a 16th century explorer but from the comfort of a 21st century expedition ship, complete with guides and naturalists eager to share the history of the area. Grab a glass of calafate sour, Malbec or Cabernet Sauvignon, say “¡Salud!” to your friends, and get ready to inspire your mind, body and soul. This part of the world is wild and nature is calling.

Fitz Roy Expedition ship, The Forrest, is well-equipped to navigate and explore the Magellan Strait, leaving you to feel like a true explorer.

Contact Reefs to Rockies today for advice on sights to see, things to do and what all you’ll need to pack to create an authentic Tierra del Fuego adventure that suits you– Are you ready to explore?

The Magellan Strait has marine biodiversity that offers some of the most unexpected wildlife viewing you can imagine– be on the look out for Humpbacks, sea lions, leopard seals.